Naples

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BaconFest

FESTIVAL GENIUS

The word bacon is an international affair. Throughout history we have cooked slices of salted/cured pork and called it bacon, but very few nations have elevated bacon into an art form in quite the same way as the British. Even fewer have been incredibly genius enough to create a festival with “Bacon” as the theme and then added Beer, Bands and a Naples Florida backdrop. This is genius!

BACON HISTORY

When we set out to write something up on marconaplesaccess.com we always try to go back to the history of the matter. As we started researching
the history of bacon we found that the word historically originated in the modern English language. The English bacon tradition dates back to the Saxon era in the 1st millennium AD, when “bacon” was a Middle English term that the English seem to have settled on to refer to a traditional cut of pork meat unique to the region at the time as a specific cut of pork belly and pork loin and mostly cut from breeds of pig that had been specifically bred to make what we now call back bacon. Each family had their own secret recipe for curing and smoking bacon and in the cities they bought bacon from butchers who bought bacon from farms that had their own secret recipes.

Read more…

Flamingo Island Flea Market

Flamingo Island Flea Market

The term “FLEA MARKET” it turns out is some sort of weird mystery and the history is blurry. No actual evidence exists as far as who coined this term or put the first Flea Market together. When we set out to do an article on one of the best Flea Markets in our area we asked, where did the term Flea Market even come from? Who started the first flea market? Why is it called flea market? So as we started researching we took a slight left as we stumbled on the term Flea Circus. Since we do not foresee that we will utilize this information in future articles and we love interjecting quirky unique information in our articles, take a left turn real quick with us.

FLEA CIRCUS

The first records of flea performances were actually started by watchmakers who were demonstrating their metalworking skills. Mark Scaliot in 1578 produced a lock and chain which he attached to a flea. Flea performances were first advertised as early as 1833 in England, and were a major carnival attraction until 1930. Some flea circuses persisted in very small venues in the United States as late as the 1960s. The flea circus at Belle Vue Zoological Gardens, Manchester, England, was still operating in 1970. Fleas live only a few months and from what we understand they cannot be trained to do anything. The genius flea circus inventors basically wrapped a tiny thin wire around the flea’s neck. The wire would be connected to props like tiny balls and when they would jump away it would move the ball. They also connected them to tiny carts and or a small ferris wheel and the props of course moved. They augmented these displays with hidden mechanical systems that would astound most crowds and in the 1800′s this was probably one of the coolest things people ever seen.

MONDAY TRADE DAYS

Let us veer back to the right and see what we discovered about the term Flea Market. The first American flea market was supposedly called the Monday Trade Days in Canton, Texas, which began in 1873. At Monday Trade Days people originally would buy horses. With a captive crowd someone had the bright idea to also sell goods or trade. This was a pretty smart idea. It went so well that other people copied the idea and created these markets in other towns. Our research also discovered that the Flea Market may have been created by Russell Carrell, an east-coast antique show organizer. Working as an auctioneer in Connecticut, Carrell thought to run an antique show like an outdoor auction. Carrell’s 1956 Hartford open-air antiques market was claimed to be the first modern incarnation of the flea market, although the true flea market does not consist of professional antique dealers, but rather of people looking to make some extra money on the side.

The other credit for flea market was a location in Paris, France in the 1860′s known as the marche aux puces, translation, “Flea Market”. This was discovered from an article “What Is A Flea Market?” by Albert LaFarge in the 1998 winter edition of Today’s Flea Market magazine. In his article LaFarge says, “There is a general agreement that the term “Flea Market” is a literal translation of the French marche aux puces, an outdoor bazaar in Paris, France, named after those pesky little parasites of the order Siphonaptera (or “wingless bloodsucker”) that infested the upholstery of old furniture brought out for sale.” This one seems to make alot of sense to us.

NAPOLEON’S ARCHITECT

Then we have another area of research that a European book about flea markets claims “In the time of Emperor Napoleon III, the imperial architect Haussmann made plans for the broad, straight boulevards with rows of square houses in the center of Paris, along which army divisions that could march with much pompous noise. The plans forced many dealers in second-hand goods to flee their old dwellings; the alleys and slums were demolished. These dislodged merchants were, however, allowed to continue selling their wares undisturbed right in the north of Paris, just outside of the former fort, in front of the gate Porte de Clignancourt. The first stalls were erected in about 1860. The gathering together of all these exiles from the slums of Paris was soon given the name “Marche aux Puces”, meaning “flee market”, later translation.

AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE

Wherever the term came it stuck so “Flea Market” it is. It is a facility that rents space to anyone that offers for sale to the general public merchandise, products, items, services and all other needs of the buying public. These renters are known as vendors. Flea Markets are the incubators and breeding grounds of entrepreneurs that represent the Free Enterprise System and they are the representatives and protectors of an American Way of Life. Flea Markets are the only opportunity available for a person to start a business without a large layout of capital and long term commitments. Now this brings us- or you- to where you can find a cool flea market to take the family to. Our local flea market would be in Bonita Springs Florida and it’s called the Flamingo Island Flea Market.

FLAMINGO ISLAND FLEA MARKET

Even in this age of online commerce, shoppers still flock to flea markets and antique shows. Flamingo Island is a buyer’s paradise and something great to do for the whole family. There are items for sale here that you literally cannot get anywhere else. Best of all prices are better than discount stores or even on the Internet and offer a wide selection of arts and crafts, collectibles, jewelry, wigs, electronics, skincare products, hand rolled cigars, fruits, vegetables, musical instruments, military gear, clothing, as seen on tv products, hair salon, vapor dealers and many other unique and hard to find items. We can truly say there is something for everyone and it is all indoors.

If you get hungry Flamingo Island has you covered. The market has food vendors serving great food from hamburgers and hot dogs to pies, cakes, donuts, pizza, and roasted peanuts in addition to many other foods carried by vendors throughout the market. Flamingo Island has something there for everyone. You can make an appointment at some of the Flamingo Island salons. You can have some lunch or do some shopping while you wait. How about a hand rolled cigar while you watch? How about a leather repair and watch the expert work? How about catching some live music and a beer? The Flamingo Island Flea market in Bonita Springs, Florida, is a friendly, clean, safe place, to bring the kids for a great day of fun. When you’re looking for things to do, Flamingo gets our thumbs up!

Read more…

Avenue5

There's a table for six in the southeast corner of Avenue5. One end borders the plaza in front of Sugden Community Theatre, while another side parallels the walkway along Naples' posh Fifth Avenue South.

Glass doors and giant, retracting windows separate it from the outside. With the windows pulled back on a recent afternoon, the table was exposed to perfect January weather, complete with refreshing breezes.

By Chef David Nelson's estimation, there aren't many better spots in town to enjoy a meal.

"That's one of the best tables in Naples," said Nelson, who joined the upscale eatery as executive chef in early October, with the goal of rejuvenating the restaurant's reputation, "but they just didn't have the food to complement it. So that's what I'm really trying to do: just complement what's already here."

Avenue5, which is connected to the Inn on Fifth, opened to much anticipation in February 2014. It boasts an airy interior decorated in a glam neutral palette with pops of orangy red and plenty of gleaming metal accents. Aesthetically, it is the antithesis of the beloved McCabe's Irish Pub and Grill, which operated in this location for 15 years, ending in 2013.

Nelson left Truluck's, a well-known seafood and steak establishment just around the corner, after Avenue5's first chef, John Welch, just didn't bring the quality and "wow factor" diners expected.

Nelson is working hard to reshape the restaurant's culinary identity.

"I know a lot of people around town, and Avenue5 did not start off on the right foot, reputation wise," he said. "A lot of people gave it a chance. I know I ate here after they had been open three or four months, and I mean it just — it wasn't good."

Whipping up a new reputation for Avenue5 is all about the basics, the former Army Ranger food service specialist insists. He relies on having the right equipment, teaching and executing solid cooking fundamentals and leading by example. Behind the scenes, much has changed in Nelson's first three months at the restaurant.

At his request, McCabe purchased a new grill so the kitchen could turn out better steaks. Inventive masterpieces by Avenue5's recently hired pastry chef, Anthony Valerio, have replaced frozen desserts purchased from a supplier. The menu has been completely redesigned.

Though Nelson maintains that his culinary approach, for now, centers around delivering well-prepared, high-quality, recognizable dishes, his food goes beyond those basics. At Avenue5, creativity and expertly designed flavor and texture combinations are on full display.

For Nelson's grilled Colorado lamb chops, a simple pan sauce isn't enough. Instead, you'll find his topped by horseradish and goat cheese crème fraîche, along with vibrant chimichurri that gets an extra kick from rosé vinegar.

At a private tasting and wine dinner Avenue5 hosted in the first week of 2016, butter-poached lobster tail — cooked sous vide in tarragon, butter and lemon, then dressed with corn-tarragon zabaglione — accompanied the lamb chops for an imaginative take on surf and turf. Corn and lemon notes lifted the buttery lobster. The plate also held a serving of perfectly executed dauphinoise potato.

The dish was a pleasant surprise for diner JoNell Modys, public relations and communications manager of the Naples, Marco Island, Everglades Convention and Visitors Bureau. She called the lamb chops and chimichurri "an unexpected combination with great flavor."

The restaurant team paired this dish with a 2012 pinot noir from Domaine Serene, a winery established in Oregon's Willamette Valley by part-time Naples residents.

Most people wouldn't see this as just "simple food," but that's how Nelson views it.

Many restaurants "forget simplicity is sometimes what's best," the chef told diners at the private event. He emphasized that building the restaurant's reputation requires mastering dishes that people relate to, not focusing on culinary trends.

The tasting and wine dinner opened with a Maine lobster cocktail that included Champagne dressing, heirloom tomato, grapefruit, avocado and a custom blend of micro herbs with citrus notes. The herb blend, put together by the local Colusa Farms, is known as the "tangerine blast."

Next, tender bay scallop shone through in a refined ceviche, accented by pickled ginger, lemon grass, lime and cilantro. Wonton crisps and creamy avocado mousse were superb foils for the heat and bright, sweet notes of the ceviche.

The third course offered ricotta and mascarpone gnudi (a dumpling-like, cheese-filled pasta), served with a tender meatball and deeply flavored golden garlic tomato sauce.

Then came the luxurious and nuanced surf and turf, followed by a three-dessert sampler featuring a chocolate pot de crème, key lime cheesecake and a six-layer chocolate cake built on a base of chocolate chip cookie.

A wine from the restaurant's dazzling glass wine walls complemented each savory course and mini dessert.

"I think Chef Nelson has hit on a flavorful and interesting combination of dishes that will bring in the tourist crowd, as well as appeal to local diners," Modys said in a statement after the event. "His enthusiasm for the menu is contagious and I think he and his team will bring a new energy to the Fifth Avenue South dining scene."

Nelson himself makes no secret of the fact that after years without the freedom to create his own menu items, he finds the challenge of breathing new life into Avenue5 immensely enjoyable.

"I have not had more fun cooking in a long time than I have the last few months here," he said.

Contributor: Laura Mize

Read more…

Old Naples Pub

Ahhh, fishing. Casting your line over the side of the pier in hopes of catching a big one. What fun! But where do we go when your stomach grumbles?  Old Naples Pub, of course! This casual family friendly pub is just a short stroll from the Naples historic fishing pier and Naples shopping district.

Opened in 1990, this pub also offers weekly live entertainment and regular performances on the 100-year-old tavern piano.

 

John Esquivel – Thursday, Friday & Saturday Nights
Pianist/Composer “We don’t even remember how John Esquivel started playing piano at the Old Naples Pub. He’s just always been there. Some say he was a dashing, international spy, tracking down some dangerous arch criminal. Others say he’s a romantic international celebrity, living incognito a la Casablanca. All we know is, he can really tickle those ivories on that old saloon piano and, believe us, that ain’t easy tickling.”

” Esquivel launches into another string of songs. Alternating between classical and jazz, with the occasional pop number thrown in. Esquivel is one of the reasons locals and long-time tourists flock to Old Naples Pub” –Jonathan Foerster / Naples Daily News

 

Wednesday and Sunday Nights
Harp Guitarist/Humorist – www.harpguitarguy.com

“When a six-foot-seven-inch guy walks up to you and says he wants to play his “harp-guitar” at your place every week, you listen. And we did. (never heard of a “harp-guitar?” Neither had we.) And we’ve been listening ever since.”

“…a breath of fresh air. Listening to him perform is a guitarists delight.” –Peter Roth / The Ithica Times

 

http://www.naplespubs.com/old_naples_pub/default.php

255 13th Avenue South, Naples, Florida

(239) 649-8200

Read more…

Avenue5

There's a table for six in the southeast corner of Avenue5. One end borders the plaza in front of Sugden Community Theatre, while another side parallels the walkway along Naples' posh Fifth Avenue South.

Glass doors and giant, retracting windows separate it from the outside. With the windows pulled back on a recent afternoon, the table was exposed to perfect January weather, complete with refreshing breezes.

By Chef David Nelson's estimation, there aren't many better spots in town to enjoy a meal.

"That's one of the best tables in Naples," said Nelson, who joined the upscale eatery as executive chef in early October, with the goal of rejuvenating the restaurant's reputation, "but they just didn't have the food to complement it. So that's what I'm really trying to do: just complement what's already here."

Avenue5, which is connected to the Inn on Fifth, opened to much anticipation in February 2014. It boasts an airy interior decorated in a glam neutral palette with pops of orangy red and plenty of gleaming metal accents. Aesthetically, it is the antithesis of the beloved McCabe's Irish Pub and Grill, which operated in this location for 15 years, ending in 2013.

Nelson left Truluck's, a well-known seafood and steak establishment just around the corner, after Avenue5's first chef, John Welch, just didn't bring the quality and "wow factor" diners expected.

Nelson is working hard to reshape the restaurant's culinary identity.

"I know a lot of people around town, and Avenue5 did not start off on the right foot, reputation wise," he said. "A lot of people gave it a chance. I know I ate here after they had been open three or four months, and I mean it just — it wasn't good."

Whipping up a new reputation for Avenue5 is all about the basics, the former Army Ranger food service specialist insists. He relies on having the right equipment, teaching and executing solid cooking fundamentals and leading by example. Behind the scenes, much has changed in Nelson's first three months at the restaurant.

At his request, McCabe purchased a new grill so the kitchen could turn out better steaks. Inventive masterpieces by Avenue5's recently hired pastry chef, Anthony Valerio, have replaced frozen desserts purchased from a supplier. The menu has been completely redesigned.

Though Nelson maintains that his culinary approach, for now, centers around delivering well-prepared, high-quality, recognizable dishes, his food goes beyond those basics. At Avenue5, creativity and expertly designed flavor and texture combinations are on full display.

For Nelson's grilled Colorado lamb chops, a simple pan sauce isn't enough. Instead, you'll find his topped by horseradish and goat cheese crème fraîche, along with vibrant chimichurri that gets an extra kick from rosé vinegar.

At a private tasting and wine dinner Avenue5 hosted in the first week of 2016, butter-poached lobster tail — cooked sous vide in tarragon, butter and lemon, then dressed with corn-tarragon zabaglione — accompanied the lamb chops for an imaginative take on surf and turf. Corn and lemon notes lifted the buttery lobster. The plate also held a serving of perfectly executed dauphinoise potato.

The dish was a pleasant surprise for diner JoNell Modys, public relations and communications manager of the Naples, Marco Island, Everglades Convention and Visitors Bureau. She called the lamb chops and chimichurri "an unexpected combination with great flavor."

The restaurant team paired this dish with a 2012 pinot noir from Domaine Serene, a winery established in Oregon's Willamette Valley by part-time Naples residents.

Most people wouldn't see this as just "simple food," but that's how Nelson views it.

Many restaurants "forget simplicity is sometimes what's best," the chef told diners at the private event. He emphasized that building the restaurant's reputation requires mastering dishes that people relate to, not focusing on culinary trends.

The tasting and wine dinner opened with a Maine lobster cocktail that included Champagne dressing, heirloom tomato, grapefruit, avocado and a custom blend of micro herbs with citrus notes. The herb blend, put together by the local Colusa Farms, is known as the "tangerine blast."

Next, tender bay scallop shone through in a refined ceviche, accented by pickled ginger, lemon grass, lime and cilantro. Wonton crisps and creamy avocado mousse were superb foils for the heat and bright, sweet notes of the ceviche.

The third course offered ricotta and mascarpone gnudi (a dumpling-like, cheese-filled pasta), served with a tender meatball and deeply flavored golden garlic tomato sauce.

Then came the luxurious and nuanced surf and turf, followed by a three-dessert sampler featuring a chocolate pot de crème, key lime cheesecake and a six-layer chocolate cake built on a base of chocolate chip cookie.

A wine from the restaurant's dazzling glass wine walls complemented each savory course and mini dessert.

"I think Chef Nelson has hit on a flavorful and interesting combination of dishes that will bring in the tourist crowd, as well as appeal to local diners," Modys said in a statement after the event. "His enthusiasm for the menu is contagious and I think he and his team will bring a new energy to the Fifth Avenue South dining scene."

Nelson himself makes no secret of the fact that after years without the freedom to create his own menu items, he finds the challenge of breathing new life into Avenue5 immensely enjoyable.

"I have not had more fun cooking in a long time than I have the last few months here," he said.

Contributor: Laura Mize

Read more…

BaconFest

FESTIVAL GENIUS

The word bacon is an international affair. Throughout history we have cooked slices of salted/cured pork and it is called bacon, but very few nations have elevated bacon into an art form, in quite the same way as the British and very few have been incredibly genius enough to create a festival with “Bacon” as the theme and then adding Beer, Bands and a Naples Florida backdrop. This is genius!

o-BEST-BACON-DISHES-AMERICA-facebook

BACON HISTORY

When we set out to write something up on marconaplesaccess.com we always try to go back to the history of the matter. As we started researching the history of bacon we found that the word historically originated in the modern English language. The English bacon tradition dates back to the Saxon era in the 1st millennium AD, bacon or bacon was a Middle English term that the English seem to have settled on in order to refer to a traditional cut of pork meat unique to the region at the time as a specific cut of pork belly and pork loin and mostly cut from breeds of pig that had been specifically bred to make what we now call back bacon. Each family had their own secret recipe for curing and smoking bacon and in the cities they bought bacon from butchers who bought bacon from farms that had their own secret recipes.

Read more…

Flamingo Island Flea Market

The term “FLEA MARKET” it turns out is some sort of weird mystery and the history is blurry. No actual evidence exists as far as who coined this term or put the first Flea Market together. When we set out to do an article on one of the best Flea Markets in our area we asked where did the term Flea Market even come from? Who started the first flea market? Why is it called flea market? So as we started researching we took a slight left as we stumbled on the term Flea Circus. Since we do not foresee that we will utilize this information in future articles and we love interjecting quirky unique information in our articles take a left turn real quick with us.

FLEA CIRCUS

The first records of flea performances were actually started by watchmakers who were demonstrating their metalworking skills. Mark Scaliot in 1578 produced a lock and chain which he attached to a flea. Flea performances were first advertised as early as 1833 in England, and were a major carnival attraction until 1930. Some flea circuses persisted in very small venues in the United States as late as the 1960s. The flea circus at Belle Vue Zoological Gardens, Manchester, England, was still operating in 1970. Fleas live only a few months and from what we understand they cannot be trained to do anything. The genius flea circus inventors basically wrapped a tiny thin wire around the flea’s neck. The wire would be connected to props like tiny balls and when they would jump away it would move the ball. They also connected them to tiny carts and or a small ferris wheel and the props of course moved. They augmented these displays with hidden mechanical systems that would astound most crowds and in the 1800′s this was probably one of the coolest things people ever seen.

flea_circus_indoor_oldtime_brown100_72dpi

MONDAY TRADE DAYS

Let us veer back to the right and see what we discovered about the term Flea Market. The first American flea market was supposedly called the Monday Trade Days in Canton, Texas, which began in 1873. At Monday Trade Days people originally would buy horses. With a captive crowd someone had the bright idea to also sell goods or trade. This was a pretty smart idea. It went so well that other people copied the idea and created these markets in other towns. Our research also discovered that the Flea Market may have been created by Russell Carrell, an east-coast antique show organizer. Working as an auctioneer in Connecticut, Carrell thought to run an antique show like an outdoor auction. Carrell’s 1956 Hartford open-air antiques market was claimed to be the first modern incarnation of the flea market, although the true flea market does not consist of professional antique dealers, but rather of people looking to make some extra money on the side.

The other credit for flea market was a location in Paris, France in the 1860′s known as the marche aux puces, translation, “Flea Market”. This was discovered from an article “What Is A Flea Market?” by Albert LaFarge in the 1998 winter edition of Today’s Flea Market magazine. In his article LaFarge says, “There is a general agreement that the term “Flea Market” is a literal translation of the French marche aux puces, an outdoor bazaar in Paris, France, named after those pesky little parasites of the order Siphonaptera (or “wingless bloodsucker”) that infested the upholstery of old furniture brought out for sale.” This one seems to make alot of sense to us.

storeout19

NAPOLEON’S ARCHITECT

Then we have another area of research that a European book about flea markets claims “In the time of Emperor Napoleon III, the imperial architect Haussmann made plans for the broad, straight boulevards with rows of square houses in the center of Paris, along which army divisions that could march with much pompous noise. The plans forced many dealers in second-hand goods to flee their old dwellings; the alleys and slums were demolished. These dislodged merchants were, however, allowed to continue selling their wares undisturbed right in the north of Paris, just outside of the former fort, in front of the gate Porte de Clignancourt. The first stalls were erected in about 1860. The gathering together of all these exiles from the slums of Paris was soon given the name “Marche aux Puces”, meaning “flee market”, later translation.

Portese8

AMERICAN WAY OF LIFE

Wherever the term came it stuck so “Flea Market” it is. It is a facility that rents space to anyone that offers for sale to the general public merchandise, products, items, services and all other needs of the buying public. These renters are known as vendors. Flea Markets are the incubators and breeding grounds of entrepreneurs that represent the Free Enterprise System and they are the representatives and protectors of an American Way of Life. Flea Markets are the only opportunity available for a person to start a business without a large layout of capital and long term commitments. Now this brings us or you to where you can find a cool flea market to take the family to. Our local flea market would be in Bonita Springs Florida and its called the Flamingo Island Flea Market.

paris-flea-mrkt

FLAMINGO ISLAND FLEA MARKET

Even in this age of online commerce, shoppers still flock to flea markets and antique shows. Flamingo Island is a buyer’s paradise and something great to do for the whole family. There are items for sale here that you literally cannot get anywhere else. Best of all prices are better than discount stores or even on the Internet and offer a wide selection of, arts and crafts, collectibles, jewelry, wigs, electronics, skincare products, hand rolled cigars, fruits, vegetables, musical instruments, military gear, clothing, as seen on tv products, hair salon, vapor dealers and many other unique and hard to find items. We can truly say there is something for everyone and it is all indoors.

If you get hungry Flamingo Island has you covered. The market has food vendors serving great food from hamburgers, hot dogs, pies, cakes, donuts, pizza, roasted peanuts in addition to other food vendors throughout the market. Flamingo Island has something there for everyone. You can make an appointment at some of the Flamingo Island salons. You can have some lunch or do some shopping while you wait. How about a hand rolled cigar while you watch? How about a leather repair and watch the expert work? How about catching some live music and a beer? The Flamingo Island Flea market in Bonita Springs Florida is a friendly, clean, safe place, to bring the kids for a great day of fun and when your looking for things to do Flamingo gets our thumbs up!

Read more…

Old Naples Pub

Old Naples Pub

Ahhh, fishing. Casting your line over the side of the pier in hopes of catching a big one. What fun! But where do we go when your stomach grumbles?  Old Naples Pub, of course! This casual family friendly pub is just a short stroll from the Naples historic fishing pier and Naples shopping district.
Opened in 1990, this pub also offers weekly live entertainment and regular performances on the 100 year old tavern piano.
John Esquivel – Thursday, Friday & Saturday Nights
Pianist Composer“We don’t even remember how John Esquivel started playing piano at the Old Naples Pub. He’s just always been there. Some say he was a dashing, international spy, tracking down some dangerous arch criminal. Others say he’s a romantic international celebrity, living incognito a la Casablanca. All we know is, he can really tickle those ivories on that old saloon piano and, believe us, that ain’t easy tickling.”

” Esquivel launches into another string of songs. Alternating between classical and jazz, with the occasional pop number thrown in. Esquivel is one of the reasons locals and long-time tourists flock to Old Naples Pub” –Jonathan Foerster / Naples Daily NewsAndy Wahlberg-
Wednesday and Sunday Nights
Harp Guitarist/Humorist – www.harpguitarguy.com
“When a six foot seven inch guy walks up to you and says he wants to play his “harp-guitar” at your place every week, you listen. And we did. (never heard of a “harp-guitar?” Neither had we.) And we’ve been listening ever since.”“…a breath of fresh air. Listening to him perform is a guitarists delight.” –Peter Roth / The Ithica Times
http://www.naplespubs.com/old_naples_pub/default.php

255 13th Avenue South, Naples, Florida

(239) 649-8200
Read more…
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5 Akomodasi Terbaik di Indonesia: Kunjungi dan Nikmati!

5 tempat terbaik ketika kita berkunjung ke Indonesia, umumnya berkisar dari hotel terkenal di pantai indah Nusa Dua sampai ke Yogyakarta, jangan sampai melewatkan kesenian Jawa serta pusat bud…
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